Growth & Development



Bright Futures Parent Handout: 1 Month Visit

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Here are some suggestions from Bright Futures experts that may be of value to your family

Parental Well-Being

How You are Feeling

  • Taking care of yourself gives you the energy to care for your baby. Remember to go for your postpartum checkup.

  • Call for help if you feel sad or blue, or very tired for more than a few days.

  • Know that returning to work or school is hard for many parents.

  • Find safe, loving child care for your baby. You can ask us for help.

  • If you plan to go back to work or school, start thinking about how you can keep breastfeeding.

Infant Adjustment

Getting to Know Your Baby

  • Have simple routines each day for bathing, feeding, sleeping, and playing.

  • Put your baby to sleep on his back.

    • In a crib, in your room, not in your bed.

    • In a crib that meets current safety standards, with no drop-side rail and slats no more than 2 3/8 inches apart.

      Find more information on the Consumer Product Safety Commission Web site at www.cpsc.gov.

    • If your crib has a drop-side rail, keep it up and locked at all times. Contact the crib company to see if there is a device to keep the drop-side rail from falling down.

    • Keep soft objects and loose bedding such as comforters, pillows, bumper pads, and toys out of the crib.

    • Give your baby a pacifier if he wants it.

  • Hold and cuddle your baby often.

    • Tummy time—put your baby on his tummy when awake and you are there to watch.

  • Crying is normal and may increase when your baby is 6–8 weeks old.

  • When your baby is crying, comfort him by talking, patting, stroking, and rocking.

  • Never shake your baby.

  • If you feel upset, put your baby in a safe place; call for help.

Safety

Safety

  • Use a rear-facing car safety seat in all vehicles.

  • Never put your baby in the front seat of a vehicle with a passenger air bag.

  • Always wear your seat belt and never drive after using alcohol or drugs.

  • Keep your car and home smoke-free.

  • Keep hanging cords or strings away from and necklaces and bracelets off of your baby.

  • Keep a hand on your baby when changing clothes or the diaper.

Family Adjustment

Your Baby and Family

  • Plan with your partner, friends, and family to have time for yourself.

  • Take time with your partner too.

  • Let us know if you are having any problems and cannot make ends meet. There are resources in our community that can help you.

  • Join a new parents group or call us for help to connect to others if you feel alone and lonely.

  • Call for help if you are ever hit or hurt by someone and if you and your baby are not safe at home.

  • Prepare for an emergency/illness.

    • Keep a first-aid kit in your home.

    • Learn infant CPR.

    • Have a list of emergency phone numbers.

    • Know how to take your baby's temperature rectally. Call us if it is 100.4°F (38.0°C) or higher.

  • Wash your hands often to help your baby stay healthy.

Feeding Routines

Feeding Your Baby

  • Feed your baby only breast milk or iron- fortified formula in the first 4–6 months.

  • Pat, rock, undress, or change the diaper to wake your baby to feed.

  • Feed your baby when you see signs of hunger.

    • Putting hand to mouth

    • Sucking, rooting, and fussing

  • End feeding when you see signs your baby is full.

    • Turning away

    • Closing the mouth

    • Relaxed arms and hands

  • Breastfeed or bottle-feed 8–12 times per day.

  • Burp your baby during natural feeding breaks.

  • Having 5–8 wet diapers and 3–4 stools each day shows your baby is eating well.

If Breastfeeding

  • Continue to take your prenatal vitamins.

  • When breastfeeding is going well (usually at 4–6 weeks), you can offer your baby a bottle or pacifier.

If Formula Feeding

  • Always prepare, heat, and store formula safely. If you need help, ask us.

  • Feed your baby 2 oz every 2–3 hours. If your baby is still hungry, you can feed more.

  • Hold your baby so you can look at each other.

  • Do not prop the bottle.

What to Expect at Your Baby's 2 Month Visit

We will talk about

  • Taking care of yourself and your family

  • Sleep and crib safety

  • Keeping your home safe for your baby

  • Getting back to work or school and finding child care

  • Feeding your baby

© 2010 American Academy of Pediatrics

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